Education (EDU)

EDU-101 Introduction to Student Development

The course examines child and adolescent development through a pedagogical perspective. Through a variety of course texts, students will be introduced to theories of development and to the concept of diversity as it relates to student development. They will also be involved in K-12 field placements through which they are introduced to qualitative data collection/analysis techniques. EDU 101 students will examine their own development through autobiographical writing and compose variety of reflective and analytical reports based on their K-12 field work. The required technology thread for this course includes effective use of Word and presentation software (e.g., PowerPoint and Prezi), management of electronic files, and extensive use of course management systems for access to electronic files and submission of assignments (e.g., Moodle/Canvas). Field component: Students in EDU 101 complete a total of 24 hours of field work spread across the semester in three school settings: elementary, middle, and high school. While the nature of the field work is largely observational and students do not have explicit teaching responsibilities, they are expected to be engaged in the life of the host classes and to interact with host teachers and students in ways that are helpful and enable them to learn about K-12 student development. EDU 101 students are introduced to field-based inquiry and specifically the tools of narrative inquiry as they learn methods of collecting and analyzing qualitative data. Level: Open to any student; required of all Education Studies minors. Students interested in the secondary licensure program are encouraged to take EDU 101 in the freshman or sophomore year. Offered fall and spring semesters.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Behavioral Science

EDU-201 Philosophy of Education

This class will examine foundational questions about education (e.g., What is the nature and purpose of education?) with a particular focus upon the role of public schools in a democratic society. We will read and watch texts drawn from philosophy, as well as from literature and history, as we consider the nature of teaching and learning at the classroom level and within the broader society. Issues addressed typically include: tensions between individual students' development and the needs of the broader society; the role of the educational system in a diverse and multicultural society; the nature and goals of classroom relationship (teacher/student and student/student); and approaches to educational reform. The required technology thread includes use of the computer software to create and edit documents, and use of course management software for access to electronic files and submission of assignments. There is no field component required for this course. Level: Open to any student; required of all Education Studies minors. Students interested in the secondary licensure program are encouraged to take EDU 201 in the sophomore year. Offered fall and spring semesters. Course is cross-listed in Philosophy and can be counted as a History/Philosophy/ Religion distribution credit.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

EDU-202 Middle School Methods & Literacy

The first half of this course (taught in conjunction with EDU 203) examines the theories of young adolescent development and key curricular models and debates around the contemporary middle school in the United States with attention to adolescent literacy development and instruction. Building on concepts introduced in EDU 101, students will delve more deeply into a study of young adolescent development. A field component will enable students to study how middle school settings and/or community programs seek to meet the needs of this unique developmental period called young adolescence. During the second half of the course, students will examine theories of literacy learning and current research on adolescent literacy instruction in the context of middle level education. Specifically, in the second half, EDU 202 students will begin translating the appropriate theory and methods to lesson planning and classroom instruction especially designed for middle level learners. Students will be introduced to the process of analyzing student learning to inform instruction, and will complete the Analysis of Student Learning (ASL) pilot project, which examines questions of practice related to literacy instruction and student achievement in the content areas at the middle level. As well, field work and course content will include attention to the instructional needs of instructional needs of Special Needs learners and English Language Learners at the middle level. Required field experience consists of 25 hours; see details below. EDU 202 is required for the Secondary Licensure Program, and should be taken in the sophomore or junior year. Offered in the spring semester only. Field Component: Students will fulfill their field requirement by being placed in a content-specific middle level class where they will work collaboratively with a host teacher for the entire semester. EDU 202 students are expected to participate in regular field visits and to increase the level of their involvement in coª-taught instructional activities each week. A minimum of five of the field experience hours should be spent in settings that incorporate Special Education and/or English Language Learners. The field work will culminate with EDU 202 students collaborating with host teachers to co-plan and co-teach a two-ªweek unit that emphasizes the role of literacy in the teaching of a specific content area at the middle level.
Prerequisites: EDU-101.
Credit: 1

EDU-203 Young Adolescent Development

This course (taught in conjunction with the first half of EDU 202) examines the theories of young adolescent development and key curricular models and debates around the contemporary middle school in the United States. . Building on concepts introduced in EDU 101, students will delve more deeply into a study of young adolescent development with some attention to literacy skill development. A field component (10 hours) will enable students to study how middle school settings and/or community programs seek to meet the needs of this unique developmental period called young adolescence. EDU 203 counts as .5 pedagogy credits for the minor in Education Studies, and is open to all students as an elective. Offered in the spring semester only. Field Component: Students taking EDU 203 may fulfill their field requirement in a variety of ways (e.g., placement in a middle school setting and/or by volunteering with communityª-based programs designed especially for young adolescents).
Prerequisites: EDU-101.
Credits: 0.5

EDU-230 Special Topics in Education


Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5-1

EDU-240 Educational Policy & Evaluation

This course examines educational policy at the federal and state levels. We will explore the role of educational policy in guiding educational evaluation, with particular focus upon the use-and abuse-of statistical approaches to the evaluation of teaching and learning. After an introduction to the assumptions underlying qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods designs for educational research, the focus turns to the ways in which teaching and learning processes are understood and measured in public education. Standardized testing and common practices such as "quantitizing" qualitative data are examined for their assumptions and limitations in educational settings. The goal of the course is the development of quantitative skills and literacies needed for critical participation in public discussions and decision-making about these metrics as tools for diagnosis and reform in public education. In particular, students will be prepared to better evaluate political debate and news coverage related to the assessment of teaching and learning. Calculation of descriptive statistics commonly used in classroom assessments and in standardized educational measures, including those with normal and with skewed distributions, is taught using Excel. Substantial practice is devoted to representation and interpretation of quantitative data, using Excel's graphing and charting functions.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Quantitative Skills

EDU-302 High School Methods & Diversity Educ

This course considers the curriculum and methods relevant to personal and cultural diversity (defined broadly to include developmental, motivational, gender, ethnic, cultural, and socioeconomic diversities) at the high school level. The first half of the semester (taught in conjunction with EDU 303) introduces students to the theory and practice that underlie constructivist approaches to planning and teaching in a diverse and multicultural world. Topics include relevant theoretical models and associated research for culturally sensitive pedagogy and differentiated instruction to serve diverse learners, including those with special education accommodation and/or English Language Learning (ELL) needs. The second half of the semester is focused upon translation of the appropriate theory and methods to lesson planning and classroom instruction. Required field experience consists of 25 hours; see details below. EDU 302 is required for the Secondary Licensure Program, and should be taken in the junior or senior year. Offered in the fall semester only. Field Component: Students in EDU 302 are placed in a content-specific high school classroom where they work collaboratively with a host teacher during the second half of the semester. (When possible, some field hours may be completed earlier in the semester.) EDU 302 students are expected to participate in regular (2-3 times per week) field visits to their host school and expected to increase the level of involvement in co-taught instructional activities each week. A minimum of five of the field experience hours should be spent in settings that incorporate Special Education and/or English Language Learning. The field component culminates in a two-week daily immersion experience in the high school classroom: students co-plan and co-teach lessons incorporating multiculturalism, culturally appropriate pedagogy and diversity.
Prerequisites: Prereq: EDU-101.
Credit: 1

EDU-303 Diversity and Multicultural Education

This course (taught in conjunction with the first half of EDU 302) introduces students to the theory and practice that underlie constructivist approaches to teaching in a diverse and multicultural world. It considers curriculum and planning relevant to personal and cultural diversity (defined broadly to include developmental, motivational, gender, ethnic, cultural, and socioeconomic diversities) at the high school level. Topics include relevant theoretical models and associated research for culturally sensitive pedagogy and differentiated instruction to serve diverse learners, including those with special education accommodation and/or English Language Learning (ELL) needs. EDU 303 counts as .5 pedagogy credits for the minor in Education Studies, and is open to all students as an elective. Offered in the fall semester only.
Prerequisites: Recommended EDU-201.
Credits: 0.5

EDU-330 Studies in Urban Education

In this course students study issues related to urban education and participate in a week-long immersion trip (currently to Chicago). The course is required for students who intend to complete the Secondary Licensure Program. The course culminates with an immersion trip to Chicago in May, wherein students are paired with a host teacher in a Chicago Public School and spend the week between finals and graduation immersed in the urban setting and teaching in Chicago Public Schools. Level: Required for the Secondary Licensure Program. With instructor permission, may be taken by any student in the Education Studies minor.
Prerequisites: EDU-101 and EDU-202 or 302
Credits: 0.5

EDU-370 Special Topics

This course is a seminar focused upon historical and/or philosophical topics in education. In general, historically-oriented and philosophically-oriented topics are taught in alternating years, and are cross-listed with the relevant department(s) as appropriate. The emphasis is upon shared exploration of the general background to the issue, accompanied by development of an independent research project connected to it. Because the content varies from year to year, this course may be repeated for credit with instructor permission. Level: Required for the Education Studies minor. Offered in the spring semester. Refer to the Course Descriptions document on the Registrar's webpage for Topics and Descriptions of current offerings.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1

EDU-387 Independent Study

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and the Chair/Director of Education Studies.
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5-1

EDU-388 Independent Study

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and the Chair/Director of Education Studies.
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5-1

EDU-401 Spec.Methods:Language Arts

Teaching of Language Arts (ENGLISH) In this course, using their liberal arts education and previous experiences in education classes, students will examine the methods and pedagogy specific to their discipline for teaching grades 5-12. Referring to Indiana and national content standards for secondary teachers, students will become familiar with the content and approaches to planning and instruction in middle and high school settings. As well, the course asks students to explore differentiated instruction methods-with special attention to special needs students and English language learners-the use of technology, and alternative assessments in the context of their content area. In addition, students will reflect on their beliefs and experiences with learning and teaching in their content area as they continue to develop their teaching philosophy. Students are also introduced to professional organizations and publications within their content area. Level: Open to students admitted to the Secondary Licensure Program (or with permission of the instructor). Offered fall semesters.
Prerequisites: EDU-101,201, and 202
Credits: 0.5

EDU-402 Special Methods:Math

Teaching of Mathematics In this course, using their liberal arts education and previous experiences in education classes, students will examine the methods and pedagogy specific to their discipline for teaching grades 5-12. Referring to Indiana and national content standards for secondary teachers, students will become familiar with the content and approaches to planning and instruction in middle and high school settings. As well, the course asks students to explore differentiated instruction methods-with special attention to special needs students and English language learners-the use of technology, and alternative assessments in the context of their content area. In addition, students will reflect on their beliefs and experiences with learning and teaching in their content area as they continue to develop their teaching philosophy. Students are also introduced to professional organizations and publications within their content area. Level: Open to students admitted to the Secondary Licensure Program (or with permission of the instructor). Offered fall semesters.
Prerequisites: EDU-101,201, and 202
Credits: 0.5

EDU-403 Special Methods:Lab Sciences

Teaching of Laboratory Sciences (Physics, Biology, Chemistry) In this course, using their liberal arts education and previous experiences in education classes, students will examine the methods and pedagogy specific to their discipline for teaching grades 5-12. Referring to Indiana and national content standards for secondary teachers, students will become familiar with the content and approaches to planning and instruction in middle and high school settings. As well, the course asks students to explore differentiated instruction methods-with special attention to special needs students and English language learners-the use of technology, and alternative assessments in the context of their content area. In addition, students will reflect on their beliefs and experiences with learning and teaching in their content area as they continue to develop their teaching philosophy. Students are also introduced to professional organizations and publications within their content area. Level: Open to students admitted to the Secondary Licensure Program (or with permission of the instructor). Offered fall semesters.
Prerequisites: EDU-101,201, and 202.
Credits: 0.5

EDU-404 Special Methods:Soc Science

Teaching of Social Studies (Psychology, History, Economics, Political Science In this course, using their liberal arts education and previous experiences in education classes, students will examine the methods and pedagogy specific to their discipline for teaching grades 5-12. Referring to Indiana and national content standards for secondary teachers, students will become familiar with the content and approaches to planning and instruction in middle and high school settings. As well, the course asks students to explore differentiated instruction methods-with special attention to special needs students and English language learners-the use of technology, and alternative assessments in the context of their content area. In addition, students will reflect on their beliefs and experiences with learning and teaching in their content area as they continue to develop their teaching philosophy. Students are also introduced to professional organizations and publications within their content area. Level: Open to students admitted to the Secondary Licensure Program (or with permission of the instructor). Offered fall semesters.
Prerequisites: EDU-101,201, and 202.
Credits: 0.5

EDU-405 Special Methods:Foreign Lang

Teching of Foreign Languages (Modern) In this course, using their liberal arts education and previous experiences in education classes, students will examine the methods and pedagogy specific to their discipline for teaching grades 5-12. Referring to Indiana and national content standards for secondary teachers, students will become familiar with the content and approaches to planning and instruction in middle and high school settings. As well, the course asks students to explore differentiated instruction methods-with special attention to special needs students and English language learners-the use of technology, and alternative assessments in the context of their content area. In addition, students will reflect on their beliefs and experiences with learning and teaching in their content area as they continue to develop their teaching philosophy. Students are also introduced to professional organizations and publications within their content area. Level: Open to students admitted to the Secondary Licensure Program (or with permission of the instructor). Offered fall semesters.
Prerequisites: EDU-101,201, and 202
Credits: 0.5

EDU-406 Special Methods:Latin

Teaching of Latin In this course, using their liberal arts education and previous experiences in education classes, students will examine the methods and pedagogy specific to their discipline for teaching grades 5-12. Referring to Indiana and national content standards for secondary teachers, students will become familiar with the content and approaches to planning and instruction in middle and high school settings. As well, the course asks students to explore differentiated instruction methods-with special attention to special needs students and English language learners-the use of technology, and alternative assessments in the context of their content area. In addition, students will reflect on their beliefs and experiences with learning and teaching in their content area as they continue to develop their teaching philosophy. Students are also introduced to professional organizations and publications within their content area. Level: Open to students admitted to the Secondary Licensure Program (or with permission of the instructor). Offered fall semesters.
Prerequisites: EDU-101,201,202, and 302
Credits: 0.5

EDU-421 Content Pedagogy Seminar

Used for Transition to Teach students only This practicum experience mirrors EDU 423 described above, but with adjustments in assignments to align with a 2.0 credit course. Offered in the spring semester.
Prerequisites: EDU-202,302,401,402,403,404,405,406,407
Credits: 2

EDU-423 Student Teaching Practicum

The general purpose of this practicum experience is to bridge the gap in teacher preparation between theory and practice and to provide teacher candidates with real world teaching experiences in a secondary school setting. The co-teaching model serves as the framework for this practicum, which enables teacher candidates to have a collaborative mentoring relationship with their mentor teachers. As the third piece in this collaboration, college supervisors serve as facilitators, resources, and overseers of the practicum experience. The Student Teaching Practicum places teacher candidates, who have completed all other licensure program requirements for the secondary teaching license, in a content-appropriate middle and/or high school setting where they work with a mentor teacher for an entire semester. Starting as close to the beginning of the middle/high school semester as possible, teacher candidates are expected to co-plan and co-teach for a full 15 weeks. Responsibilities for the teacher candidates will gradually shift from the mentor teacher as the "lead teacher" to the teacher candidate as the "lead teacher" and back as the practicum experience comes to a close. As well, teacher candidates are expected to conduct a classroom-based research (CBR) project and complete the licensure program e-portfolio -- both are required culminating projects for the secondary licensure program. Teacher candidates will be supported and mentored as they work on these projects during the bi-monthly seminar meetings on campus. Other topics covered in the seminar meetings will include: lesson planning, differentiated instruction, authentic assessment, technology, classroom management, and education law. Offered in fall and spring semesters.
Prerequisites: EDU-101,201,202,302,330. 0.5 credits from EDU-401,402, 403,404
Credits: 3

EDU-487 Independent Study

Credits: 1 or 1/2
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5-1

EDU-488 Independent Study

Credits: 1 or 1/2
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5

EDU-IND Independent Study

Students may enroll in independent study courses for 0.5 or 1 course credit(s), with the approval of a supervising faculty member, the appropriate department/program chair, and the student's advisor. Registration forms for independent study are available in the Registrar's Office.
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5-1