Gender Studies

Wabash College is committed to preparing its students for leadership and service in a diverse and changing society. As part of that commitment, the Minor in Gender Studies affords students the opportunity to gain a firm grounding in an interdisciplinary field that investigates the social, cultural, and biological factors that constitute femininity, masculinity, and sexual identity. Gender Studies explores the similarities and differences between the experiences, perspectives, and voices of women and men by analyzing variations in gender roles that occur across cultures and over time, examining relationships between biological differences and social power, and investigating the complex interaction of gender with race, class, and culture. Gender Studies also involves a critical investigation of strategies that aim to transform unjust or coercive social systems based on gender. Through coursework and an independent senior project, students undertake a systematic and critical analysis of gender issues across academic disciplines. The program is administered by the Gender Issues Committee.

Wabash College students who participate in the Minor in Gender Studies will enhance their preparation for careers in a wide variety of areas. These include, but are not limited to, human services, law, government, teaching, the arts, clinical work, social work, public relations, advertising, and journalism. Some graduates with expertise in Gender Studies may also pursue further study of gender as graduate students in a wide range of academic fields.

Application

Students are encouraged to declare the Minor in Gender Studies by the end of their sophomore year (although they are free to declare any time before fall semester of their senior year).

Requirements for the Minor

GEN-101Into to Gender Studies1
Electives3
Three credits from at least two different departments. 1
Human Sexual Behavior
Seminars in Theater
Classical Mythology
Fatherhood
Multicultural Lit in America
Perspectives on Philosophy
Intro to Poetry
Intro. to Short Fiction
Introduction to Student Development
Historic Techniques & Ideas
Topics in Ethics & Social Philosophy
Sex, Gender & Masculinity
Topics in Theology
Special Topics in Art History
Intro British Lit After 1900
Amer Lit before 1900
Amer Lit after 1900
Intro to the Study of Literature
Africa to 1885
Africa Since 1885
Topics in American History
Spec Topics:Anc History
World Cinema
Cross Cultural Psychology
Child Development
Theological Ethics
The American Stage
The Modern Stage
Anthropology of Religion
Topics in Modern Europe
Philosophy of Race
Studies in Multicult/Nat'l Lit
Studies in Critical Reading
Adv Topics:World&Comp History
Gender and Communication
Studies in Special Topics
Special Topics in Education
Studies in Historical Contexts
Contemporary Theology
Studies in German Culture
Intro to Spanish Literature
Research in Social Psychology
Advanced Topics: American History
Seminar in English Lit
Phil & Craft of Hist
Independent Study
Independent Study
Capstone 21
Gender Studies Capstone
Total Credits5
1

A rationale of the courses and description of planned senior capstone project should be submitted in the Spring semester of the student’s junior year to the Gender Issues Committee chair.

2

This may be either an independent study project that explores the student’s chosen focus in greater depth or, if enough students are completing minors, a seminar class in which students will explore their topics comparatively. These will be assigned as GEN-490 Gender Studies Capstone Independent Study courses, and must be approved by the Committee Chair.

Each student’s program will be approved and supervised by the Gender Issues Committee, and a member of this committee, or other faculty with relevant expertise, may serve as secondary field examiner on the senior oral examination.

Occasional courses (Special Topics or other courses of particular relevance to Gender Studies) may also count toward this requirement with the approval of the Gender Issues Committee. Interested students should consult with a member of the Gender Issues Committee for advice regarding relevant courses and the frequency of offerings. Students should also consult the Academic Bulletin and semester-by-semester information from the Registrar’s office regarding when courses are offered.

Gender Studies (GEN)

GEN-101 Into to Gender Studies

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of gender studies by exploring questions about the meaning of gender in society. The course will familiarize students with the central issues, questions and debates in Gender Studies scholarship by analyzing themes of gendered performance and power in law, culture, education, work, health, social policy and the family. Key themes may include but are not limited to the relationship between sex and gender, the legal and social workings of the private / public distinction, the way that disciplinary practices code certain behaviors as masculine or feminine, the intersection of gender with race and ethnicity, the gendered structure of power, the tension between difference and equality, the production and circulation of gender expectations in the media, and the contested role of the law in achieving equality. By course end, students will understand central themes and debates in the field of gender studies, demonstrate a facility with basic terms and concepts of the field, apply methods of analyzing gender to society and to their own life experiences and communicate effectively about these issues in writing and speech
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts, History/Philosophy/Religion

GEN-102 Human Sexual Behavior

An overview of human sexual anatomy, development, function, and diversity. Emphasis is on the psychological aspects of sexuality including the study of attitudes towards sexuality, sexual preference, love and marriage, contraception, and commercial sex. Particular attention is paid to the development and enactment of sex roles, the construction of gender, and sex differences. This course is offered in the fall semester. Refer to the Course Descriptions document on the Registrar's webpage for Topics and Descriptions of current offerings.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Behavioral Science

GEN-103 Seminars in Theater

These seminars focus on specific topics in theater and film. They are designed to introduce students to the liberal arts expressed by noteworthy pioneers and practitioners in theater and film.
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5-1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

GEN-104 Classical Mythology

This is an introduction to the content and form of the major ancient myths, chiefly Greek. The emphasis will be on interpretation, with topics to include myth, folk-tale, legend, myth and ritual, psychological uses of myth, and the structuralist school of Claude L‚ƒvi-Strauss. Particular attention will be paid to male/female archetypes, with secondary readings from Camille Paglia and Robert Bly. Comparison will also be made to several non-western mythologies. Counts toward Gender Studies.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

GEN-105 Fatherhood

An introduction to the psychological research into issues surrounding fatherhood. Topics to be covered include the role of fathers in children's development, the effect of being a father on adult development, men's views on fatherhood, the effect of fatherhood on romantic relationships, and balancing work and home life.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Behavioral Science

GEN-106 Multicultural Lit in America

The richness of American culture is a result of the contributions made by individuals from a variety of groups, each expanding our definition of what it means to be American. In this course we will study the writing and cultures of a number of groups, among them Native American, Hispanic, Gay, African American, European American, and Asian American. We will try to hear individual voices through a variety of literary forms (including film), while exploring commonalities. This course is offered in the spring semester.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

GEN-109 Perspectives on Philosophy

A course in some selected philosophical topic or range of topics designed to provide an example of philosophical reflection and inquiry. Not open to junior or senior majors without permission of the instructor.
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5-1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

GEN-115 Intro to Poetry

This class will introduce you to the study of poetry through intensive reading and intensive written analysis. We will focus on close reading of a wide range of poems from a variety of historical periods, genres, and cultures. Through a study of image, symbol, diction, syntax, meter, rhythm, and sound, we will analyze the ways in which a poem creates meaning. Written analyses will emphasize the marriage of formal and thematic elements in particular poems.
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

GEN-116 Intro. to Short Fiction

This class has two goals: to introduce the study of short fiction through intensive reading, and to familiarize students with strategies and methodologies for writing about literature. In our readings, we will explore formal issues such as tone, structure, and symbolism as well as social issues such as sexuality, race and gender. This class focuses on ways of grappling with these big questions in writing, as literary scholars do.
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

GEN-124 Introduction to Student Development

The course examines child and adolescent development through a pedagogical perspective. Through a variety of course texts, students will be introduced to theories of development and to the concept of diversity as it relates to student development. They will also be involved in K-12 field placements through which they are introduced to qualitative data collection/analysis techniques. EDU 101 students will examine their own development through autobiographical writing and compose variety of reflective and analytical reports based on their K-12 field work. The required technology thread for this course includes effective use of Word and presentation software (e.g., PowerPoint and Prezi), management of electronic files, and extensive use of course management systems for access to electronic files and submission of assignments (e.g., Moodle/Canvas). Field component: Students in EDU 101 complete a total of 24 hours of field work spread across the semester in three school settings: elementary, middle, and high school. While the nature of the field work is largely observational and students do not have explicit teaching responsibilities, they are expected to be engaged in the life of the host classes and to interact with host teachers and students in ways that are helpful and enable them to learn about K-12 student development. EDU 101 students are introduced to field-based inquiry and specifically the tools of narrative inquiry as they learn methods of collecting and analyzing qualitative data. Level: Open to any student; required of all Education Studies minors. Students interested in the secondary licensure program are encouraged to take EDU 101 in the freshman or sophomore year. Offered fall and spring semesters.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1

GEN-171 Historic Techniques & Ideas

Have you ever wanted to paint like Van Gogh? Or invent like Da Vinci? This course is the course for you! A hybrid between art historical research and hands-on studio research, this course is designed to introduce students to the historical methods used by artists. Students will research methods and complete projects using processes including, but not limited to: grinding pigments, painting with egg tempera, carving marble, sculpting with clay, learning perspective, drawing with silver, preparing a fresco painting, and photographing using a pinhole camera.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

GEN-200 Topics in Ethics & Social Philosophy

Seminar discussion of a topic or area in ethical theory, applied ethics, or social and political philosophy.
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5-1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

GEN-201 Sex, Gender & Masculinity

Biology, psychology, and culture converge to create and define all of us as gendered beings. Students enrolled in this course will explore this multifaceted dimension of human behavior by surveying current theory, research and data on the construction of men's lives, with a special focus on the construction of masculinity. Students will complete research projects on a question of their own formulation. This course is offered in the spring semester.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Behavioral Science

GEN-202 Topics in Theology

This is a discussion course on one or more figures, themes, or movements in Christian theology. Topics in recent years have included Augustine and Aquinas, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, and African Christianity.
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5-1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

GEN-203 Special Topics in Art History

The objective of this class is to develop the student's understanding of art history. Through the analysis of a particular theme or topic, students will gain a greater understanding of visual communication and its history. Since the content of this course varies from year to year, it may be repeated for credit upon the instructor's approval. Examples of course topics: Building for the Spirit; Religious Architecture from Antiquity to the Present; Women in Art; The Image of Man; Monumentality; Introduction to African Art; African American Art; The Art of the Ancient Americas; and Latin American Art.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

GEN-204 Intro British Lit After 1900

this course will introduce students to the major writers and literary trends of the British Isles after 1900. We will begin with the dawn of Modernism, after which we will trace important political, cultural, and aesthetic changes reflected in 20th and 21st century texts. How did the disintegration of the British Empire and two world wars affect British cultural identity? How was the clash between the rural and the urban reflected in the past century? We will focus on a variety of genres-fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and drama-and examine the experimentations with language and form in Modernism and Postmodernism, as well as representations of gender roles and race in selected texts by Joseph Conrad, Wilfred Owen, T.S. Eliot, W.B. Yeats, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Katherine Mansfield, George Orwell, Samuel Beckett, Doris Lessing, Eavan Boland, Muriel Spark, Angela Carter, and others. This course is offered in the spring semester.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

GEN-205 Amer Lit before 1900

A survey of major writers and literary trends from the period of exploration to the Naturalists. We will study the forging of the American literary and social consciousness in the writings of the early explorers, through the Native American oral tradition, and in works by Bradstreet, Edwards, Franklin, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Jacobs, Melville, Douglass, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, James, Crane, and Chopin. Guiding our study will be questions like "What is 'American' about American literature?" and "In what ways do myths generated by our formative literature continue to shape our personal and national identities?" This course is offered in the fall semester.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

GEN-206 Amer Lit after 1900

This survey introduces the writers and trends of our century, from realism and naturalism through modernism to the rich, fragmented energy of postmodernism and multiculturalism. Writers covered vary from year to year but may include Henry James, James Weldon Johnson, Edith Wharton, Robert Frost, Edna St. Vincent Millay, William Carlos Williams, E. E. Cummings, Ernest Hemingway, Margery Latimer, William Faulkner, Langston Hughes, Willa Cather, F. Scott Fitzgerald, J. D. Salinger, Allen Ginsberg, Gary Snyder, Amiri Baraka, John Barth, Raymond Carver, Galway Kinnell, Sharon Olds, Louise Erdrich, Sandra Cisneros, Toni Morrison, and Don DeLillo. This course is offered in the spring semester.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

GEN-207 Intro to the Study of Literature

This course offers an introduction to English literature as a field of study, an overview of genres (poetry, fiction, drama), and literary terms, the practice of close reading, and the basic premises of literary criticism. The course also focuses on developing research skills within the field. It is designed to help majors or potential majors utilize vocabulary essential to a successful literary and/or cultural analysis, study examples of published essays in the discipline, and consider the aims of literary criticism. This is a writing-intensive class. We welcome all students who are thinking about majoring in English to take this course. All English majors taking the literature track are required to take this course, preferably during their freshman or sophomore years. Students taking the creative writing track are encouraged but not required to take this course. This course is offered in the fall semester.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

GEN-208 Africa to 1885

Precolonial African history, focusing on the sociocultural, economic, and political realities of sub-Saharan societies between the Neolithic Period and the Partitioning of the Continent by European powers inaugurated in 1885. This course is offered in the fall semester (when offered).
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

GEN-209 Africa Since 1885

The period from the European Partition of Africa in 1885 to Post-independence was one of the most significant and drastic eras of change for Africans, drawing them into a global wage labor economy, and seeing them interact in new ways with migration, the World at War, and the Colonial Endeavor. This course is offered in the spring semester (when offered).
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

GEN-210 Topics in American History

Since the content of this course varies from semester to semester, it may be repeated for credit upon the instructor's approval
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5-1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

GEN-211 Spec Topics:Anc History

This is a more advanced course that focuses on a specific topic in ancient history and requires previous work. Course may be repeated as topic changes.
Prerequisites: 1 credit from CLA
Credit: 1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

GEN-212 World Cinema

The course will survey non-Hollywood international movements in the history of cinema. It will explore issues of nation, history, culture, identity and their relation to questions of film production and consumption in contemporary film culture. Emphasis will be placed on major directors, films, and movements that contributed to the development of narrative cinema internationally. The course will investigate a variety of genres and individual films, paying close attention to their aesthetic, historical, technological and ideological significance. For example, African cinema introduces themes of colonialism, resistance and post-colonial culture, while the New Iranian Cinema articulates problems of politics and censorship within a new national film culture.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

GEN-214 Cross Cultural Psychology

This course explores the ethnic and cultural sources of psychological diversity and unity through cross-cultural investigation. Topics include human development, perceptual & cognitive processes, intelligence, motives, beliefs & values, and gender relations.
Prerequisites: PSY-101
Credit: 1
Distribution: Behavioral Science

GEN-215 Child Development

This course explores the process of child development with particular emphases on cognitive and social development from infancy through early adolescence. We will discuss the development of observable behaviors such as language and aggression, the underlying mechanisms that guide and shape development, and empirically-grounded practical recommendations for fostering healthy development. Additional topics include the roles of nature and nurture in development, the formation of parent/child attachment, social cognition, autism, and peer relationships and their effect on social development. The methodologies used by researchers, and the appropriate interpretation of research findings, will be an emphasis throughout the course. Through weekly observations and naturalistic laboratory assignments in local preschools, students will learn and practice several of these research methodologies. This course is offered in the fall semester
Prerequisites: PSY-101 or 105
Credit: 1
Distribution: Behavioral Science

GEN-217 Theological Ethics

This is a discussion course that examines the relationship between religion and ethics from many different perspectives, beginning with theological models of talking about God, the self, and ethical goods and ending with discussions of specific ethical problems. American realism, Latin American liberation theology, Roman Catholic natural law theory, and environmental theology will be covered. Issues discussed include medical ethics, theology and economics, the problem of war, the role of the church in social change, and the nature of sin.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

GEN-219 The American Stage

This course will examine the rich dramatic heritage of the United States from the American Revolution to the present, with emphasis on the history of the U.S. stage and the work of major dramatists including Eugene O'Neill, Thornton Wilder, Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, and Edward Albee, among others. Plays to be studied include The Contrast, Secret Service, Uncle Tom's Cabin, Long Day's Journey Into Night, A Moon for the Misbegotten, Awake and Sing!, The Little Foxes, Our Town, The Skin of Our Teeth, Mister Roberts, A Streetcar Named Desire, The Night of the Iquana, Death of a Salesman, The Crucible, A Raisin in the Sun, The Zoo Story, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Glengarry Glen Ross, True West, Brighton Beach Memoirs, The Colored Museum, A Perfect Ganesh, Fences, Angels in America, How I Learned to Drive, and The America Play. The plays will be discussed as instruments for theatrical production; as examples of dramatic style, structure, and genre; and, most importantly, as they reflect moral, social, and political issues throughout the history of the United States. Students taking this course for credit toward the English major or minor must have taken at least one previous course in English or American literature. No more than one course taken outside the English Department will be counted toward the major or minor in English.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

GEN-224 The Modern Stage

The class will study the history of theater and the diverse forms of European drama written between 1870 and the present. Emphasis will be placed on an examination of the major theatrical movements of realism, expressionism, symbolism, epic theater, absurdism, existentialism, feminism, and postmodernism, as well as on the work of major dramatists including Henrik Ibsen, Anton Chekhov, August Strindberg, Bertolt Brecht, and Samuel Beckett, and Caryl Churchill, among others. Attention will also be paid to theatrical conventions and practices, along with discussion of varying interpretations and production problems discovered in each play. The works to be studied include Woyzeck, A Doll House, The Master Builder, Miss Julie, The Importance of Being Earnest, Ubu Roi, The Cherry Orchard, From Morn until Midnight, Galileo, Waiting for Godot, No Exit, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, Top Girls, The Beauty Queen of Leenane, and Terrorism. The plays will be discussed as instruments for theatrical production; as examples of dramatic structure, style, and genre; and, most importantly, as they reflect the moral, social, and political issues of their time. This course is suitable for freshmen and is offered in the spring semester of odd-numbered years.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

GEN-225 Anthropology of Religion

This is a discusssion course examining the various ways anthropology describes and interprets religious phenomena. The course investigates anthropological theories of religion, and examines how they apply to specific religions in diverse contexts. Particular attention is paid to the social and symbolic functions of beliefs and rituals and to the religious importance of myths, symbols, and cosmology.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

GEN-230 Topics in Modern Europe

Since the content of this course varies from semester to semester, it may be repeated for credit upon the instructor's approval
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5-1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

GEN-237 Philosophy of Race

This course covers the history of the development of the concept of race, the metaphysical framework for thinking about the "reality" of race, the various ways to consider the meaning of race, and the relation between the meaning of race and the experience of racism. Questions about how difference and equality function in the law and the application of the law, concepts of white privilege and community investment in racial distinctions, intersectional analyses that think race together with gender, class and sexuality and the concept of race in colonial and post-colonial settings are likely topics
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

GEN-300 Studies in Multicult/Nat'l Lit

Toni Morrison and the African American Novel This course is about one thing, reading Toni Morrison's novels and her literary essays. In the process, we will explore the features of what Morrison calls the African American novel. We will also come to see and understand Morrison's mastery of craft and subject in the production of amazing stories that speak the "truth in timbre." The goals are to read, learn and grow in your understanding of the possibilities and limitations of rendering a people's lived experience in language. Jewish American Literature The contributions of Jewish American writers and filmmakers have been pervasive and significant. We will read selected fiction, poetry and plays, and see films that focus on the Jewish American experience. Authors and filmmakers may include Philip Roth, Bernard Malamud, Cynthia Ozick, David Mamet, Allen Ginsberg, and Woody Allen. African American Literature: Introduction This course explores various genres of African American Literature. Emphasis is placed on works that reflect the socio-historical development of African American life. Poetry, Slave narratives, autobiographies, novels, plays, musical lyrics, and spoken word form the subject of study in the course. Special attention is given to works of fiction that become motion pictures and the emerging area of audio books. The aim of the course is to provide students with a sense of the historical and contemporary developments within African American literature. Students are introduced to African American critical theory as well as African American history. Pen and Protest: Literature and Civil Rights This course takes a literary approach to the study of the civil rights movement. Students will examine the autobiographies, plays, novels, and other various artistic expressions of the mid-1950s through 1980. The aim of the course is to explore the use of literature and art as means of political, cultural, and religious expression. Students are introduced to critical theory as well as black studies. Refer to the Course Descriptions document on the Registrar's webpage for Topics and Descriptions of current offerings.
Prerequisites: ENG-105,106,107,109,160,214,215,216,217,218,219,220,260, or 297
Credits: 0.5-1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

GEN-301 Studies in Critical Reading

This course introduces English majors and minors to a number of literary genres, makes available to them systematic critical approaches, and gives them practice in scholarly and critical disciplines. Frequent written exercises. All members of the English Department will occasionally assist in classroom work. Offered spring semesters.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1

GEN-302 Adv Topics:World&Comp History

This course provides opportunities for small group and independent work in intensive study of selected topics in world and comparative history. Since the content of this course varies from semester to semester, it may be repeated for credit upon the instructor's approval.
Prerequisites: 0.5 credit from HIS
Credit: 1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

GEN-303 Gender and Communication

As a culture, we often we take gender for granted. Yet, we live in a culture where men and women are molded and shaped by communicative practices and mass-mediated representations that generate our ideals of masculinity and femininity. This class examines this process-providing a platform for students to reflect upon gender formation and develop a theoretical vocabulary for describing this process. By the end of the semester, class participants will develop a more sophisticated understanding of the manner in which gendered messages and practices have shaped perceptions of their symbolic universe.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

GEN-304 Studies in Special Topics

Studies in Special Topics
Prerequisites: ENG-105,106,107,109,160,214,215,216,217,218,219,220,260, or 297
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

GEN-305 Special Topics in Education

This course is a seminar focused upon historical and/or philosophical topics in education. In general, historically-oriented and philosophically-oriented topics are taught in alternating years, and are cross-listed with the relevant department(s) as appropriate. The emphasis is upon shared exploration of the general background to the issue, accompanied by development of an independent research project connected to it. Because the content varies from year to year, this course may be repeated for credit with instructor permission. Level: Required for the Education Studies minor. Offered in the spring semester.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1

GEN-306 Studies in Historical Contexts

See course descriptions on Registrar's webpage
Prerequisites: 1 credit from ENG Wabash.
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

GEN-307 Contemporary Theology

Seminar discussions of selected works of some significant theologians of the 20th and 21st centuries: Karl Barth, Hans Urs von Balthasar, Paul Tillich, William Placher, Sallie McFague, J�‚ƒrgen Moltmann, and others. Special attention will be given to the role of scripture, Jesus, human experience (including race and gender issues), our understandings of God, theologies of liberation. and theology's special contribution to contemporary issues.
Prerequisites: REL-171,172,173,270, or PHI-242
Credit: 1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

GEN-310 Studies in German Culture

Studies in German Culture offers advanced study of a variety of elements of culture broadly conceived. Topics will vary and may include, but are not limited to, film, popular culture and arts. As they consider the connections among different disciplines and cultural contexts, students will develop the analytical tools and language specific to the interpretation of cultural moments and demonstrate those skills in interpretative essays and class discussion. May be retaken for credit if topic is different from previously taken course.
Prerequisites: Take GER-301 and 302 or HIS-220 or permission of instructor.
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

GEN-314 Intro to Spanish Literature

This first course in the study of literature examines the workings of literature: style, form, structure, genre, symbolism, allusion, and metaphor. It also includes an introduction to the lexicon of literary criticism and the principles of literary theory. This course is offered every semester.
Prerequisites: SPA-301
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

GEN-322 Research in Social Psychology

Students will cover a particular area of research in social psychology in more depth than is possible in a survey course. The topics covered will reflect contemporary issues in the field and may differ in different semesters. The course will cover primary research and theoretical works. A research proposal will be constructed, and students may carry out a research project in collaboration with the professor. This course is offered in the fall semester.
Prerequisites: PSY-202 and 222
Credits: 0.5
Distribution: Behavioral Science

GEN-324 Advanced Topics: American History

This course provides opportunities for small group and independent work in intensive study of selected topics in American history. Since the content of this course varies from semester to semester, it may be repeated for credit upon the instructor's approval.Refer to the Course Descriptions document on the Registrar's webpage for Topics and Descriptions of current offerings.
Prerequisites: HIS-240, 241, 242, 244, or 245
Credit: 1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

GEN-400 Seminar in English Lit

Two sections of ENG 497 are the two Advanced Courses offered every fall. These are seminars designed primarily for English majors (although occasionally English minors enroll in them). The topics vary depending upon the research and teaching interests of the faculty. They demand a high level of student involvement in research and discussion. Several short papers and a long critical essay are required. Note: the two seminars are offered only in the fall semester. Reading the Black Book "Read any good Black books lately?" This is a provocative question on so many different levels. For one, it takes for granted that there is such a thing as a "Black book" and, two, should this be the case, that some of them might actually be "good." What is at stake here is how we think of race and literary production as well as race as a critical approach to reading literature. In short, can we think of race as both a category of literary production and a tool of literary interpretation? Nobel Prize Laureate Toni Morrison admits to writing Black books. As such, Morrison's readers are expected to understand the various and varying ways that race matters in her work. However, scholar Kenneth Warren argues that African American literature is over. This course will take a deep dive into the murky waters that is the meaning and significance of race in African American letters. Students will be introduced to Black literary theory and cultural production. In addition to Morrison and Warren, students will read scholars like Houston Baker, Henry L. Gates, John Cullen Gruesser, Arna Bontemps, Robert Hemenway, and others. Students will come to understand African American literary theories such as: Ethiopianism, Double-Consciousness, New Negro, Blues People, Signifying, and call-and-response. This course is meant to help students grapple with the different ways of reading the Black book. The Body of the Other in British and Postcolonial Literature How do British and Postcolonial authors write about colonial power, political violence, and their effects on the body? We will study authors from the Caribbean, South Africa, India, Ireland, and England, and we will focus on gender roles and race, with a special emphasis on the theory of the postcolonial body. Corporality has been a central issue in the dialogue between the center of the empire (e.g., London) and the "margins" (e.g., British colonies). How do colonial and postcolonial authors describe colonizing and colonized bodies? To understand and enjoy the texts, we will also study the political context of British imperialism and the anti-imperial resistance, as well as the major premises of Neocolonialism. We will discuss the themes of the exoticized body, the dislocated body, the traumatized body, and the emasculated body, and we will focus on the intersections between gender and postcolonial theory.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

GEN-404 Phil & Craft of Hist

This course is required of all majors in history and should be taken in the junior year. Students have an opportunity to read different examples of historical writing and to examine the philosophical and methodological assumptions which underlie the historian's craft. This course is offered in the fall and spring semester.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

GEN-487 Independent Study

Enrollment Through Instructor and Department Chair.
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5-1

GEN-488 Independent Study

Enrollment Through Instructor and Department Chair.
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5-1

GEN-490 Gender Studies Capstone

Seminar in Gender Studies
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1

Eric Olofson (chair)