Multicultural American Studies

Multicultural American Studies focuses on the plural, multi-group character of the composition of the United States, a nation formed by diverse ethnic, racial, and religious groups from all over the world. Increasingly we recognize that communities—from localities to entire nation-states—are not socially homogenous and uniform, but are composed of a variety of groups. In the United States, such groups as Hispanics, African Americans, Asian Americans, Native Americans, and White ethnics like the Irish, Italians, and Jews have made unique contributions to a country that has historically defined itself as White, Protestant, and English. The multicultural perspective analyzes how the United States, like other nations, is shaped by the interaction of groups with each other and with prevailing definitions of the nation’s character and culture. It explores, across disciplines, the ways various groups represent themselves and are represented by others and themes such as cultural encounters and blending (syncretism), identity (how a group represents itself and is seen by others), family, the arts, rituals and other manifestations of cultural and community life. Through course work and possibly a related off-campus study experience, students who complete the Multicultural American Studies minor may gain an increased understanding of this perspective.

Requirements for the Minor

Students will usually declare the minor by the end of their sophomore year. At that time the student will organize a faculty committee, work out a rationale and plan of study with that committee, and submit the proper form obtained from the Registrar’s Office. Each minor will carry a descriptive title on the form, such as “Multicultural Studies”, “Latino Studies”, or “Africana Studies”.

Core4
Four credits, from at least two departments 1
Multicultural Lit in America
World Music
Topics in Music
Ritual Objects & American Culture
Topics in Theater and Film
World History Since 1500
World Lit in Translation
Religion in America
Philosophy of Education
Multicultural Literatures
Special Topics in Art History
Peoples & Nations of Latin America
Instruments and Culture
Culture and Psychology
Global Pers. on Music Cultures&identity
Philosophy of Race
American Dialects
Topics in Ethics & Social Philosophy
The Multicultural Stage
America to 1877
America Since 1877
Topics in American History
African American History
Topics in Latin Amer. History
Topics in Asian History
Topics in African History
African History to 1885
African History From 1885
Topics in Theology
African American Political Theories
Spc Topics: Political in Science
African American Religion
Anthropology of Religion
Studies in Multicultural/National Lit
Adv Topics: American History
Intro to Literature
Studies in Historical Contexts
Diversity/Multicultural Educat
Special Topics: Literature/Fine Arts
Studies in Culture
Studies in Hispanic Literature
Research in Social Psychology
Latin American Politics
Advanced Topics Latin America
Adv Topics in African History
Special Topics in Education
Proseminar: African Am Intel Thought
Capstone 2
MAS-400Senior Capstone1
Total Credits5
1

The Department of Modern Languages and Literature offers a variety of courses that could be used for the Multicultural American Studies minor. Please contact the Department Chair for additional information.

2

This may either be an independent study project under the direction of one of the faculty committee members or, if enough students are completing areas of concentration in a given year, an arranged class in which students will explore their minor topics comparatively as well as in greater depth. (These will be assigned as Divisional Independent Study courses under the direction of the Committee Chair.)

Off Campus Study

Students who choose to complete the minor in Multicultural American Studies may wish to consider off-campus study programs such as the Philadelphia Urban Semester, the New York Arts Program, the Newberry Library Program in Chicago, and the Borders Program in El Paso. Students may wish to include relevant coursework during off campus study.

Multicultural American Studies (MAS)

MAS-101 Multicultural Lit in America

The richness of American culture is a result of the contributions made by individuals from a variety of groups, each expanding our definition of what it means to be American. In this course we will study the writing and cultures of a number of groups, among them Native American, Hispanic, Gay, African American, European American, and Asian American. We will try to hear individual voices through a variety of literary forms (including film), while exploring commonalities. This course is offered in the spring semester.Refer to the Course Descriptions document on the Registrar's webpage for Topics and Descriptions of current offerings.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

MAS-102 World Music

An introduction to the various world musical cultures and practices found outside the Western Classical Art tradition. The course gives an overview of music genres, instrumental types and resources, forms, and styles that originate from selected world music traditions in sub-Saharan Africa, Arabic Africa, Middle East, Near East, North America, South/Latin America, and the Caribbean region. Musical practices are studied in terms of structure, performance, aesthetic values, cross-cultural contacts, contextual function, and significance. Coursework includes weekly reading and listening assignments, musical demonstrations, and hands-on experience, as well as the acquisition and development of listening skills. This course is open to all students, is suitable for fulfilling distribution requirements, and is offered in the fall semester.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

MAS-104 Topics in Music

A class for all students, regardless of background. Previous topics have included the history of jazz, the symphony, music of Duke Ellington, music of J.S. Bach, music of Beethoven, and music and technology. Suitable for fulfilling distribution requirements. This course does not count toward the major.
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

MAS-105 Ritual Objects & American Culture

The course will study the very rich and diverse cultures of the indigenous peoples of North America through an examination of their ritual objects. Through slide presentations, videos, readings, field trips and visits by Native American spiritual leaders and artists, we will discover the interdependence of the ritual object and dance, music, prayer songs, creation stories and healing ceremonies. Although the course will concentrate on traditional Native American Culture, the class will conclude with an examination of the work of selected contemporary Native American artists. In these sessions we will discuss how traditional visual images and ideas have been reworked by these artists to communicate contemporary political, economic and environmental issues.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

MAS-110 Topics in Theater and Film

These seminars focus on specific topics in theater and film. They are designed to introduce students to the liberal arts expressed by noteworthy pioneers and practitioners in theater and film.Refer to the Course Descriptions document on the Registrar's webpage for Topics and Descriptions of current offerings.
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

MAS-111 World History Since 1500

This course traces the increasing interdependence of the world's different societies as improved communications tie more of the world closely together. This will involve explaining the transformations wrought upon different areas by industrialization and the reactions this process has created across the globe. This course, along with HIS 101, is especially recommended to those students taking their first college-level history course. This course is offered in the spring semester.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

MAS-112 World Lit in Translation

This course will focus on 20th-century literature in translation from South America, the Caribbean, Europe, Japan, China, Senegal, India, Egypt, and Israel. Thematically, the course will address nationalism, language, political violence, ethnic cleansing, colonialism, exile, gender inequality, and globalization. We will examine a variety of texts translated into English to determine how people in non-Anglophone nations have defined their national identities, often after decades or centuries of foreign oppression. This course is offered in the spring semester.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

MAS-181 Religion in America

This is an introduction to the religious history of America. It will explore the historical development of the primary religious traditions in America, especially Protestantism, Catholicism, and Judaism, as well as the formative influence of religion among women, African Americans, and American Indians. Principal themes include pluralism, the impact of religious disestablishment, revivalism and reform, theological movements, and religious innovation. This course is offered in the fall semester.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

MAS-201 Philosophy of Education

This class will examine foundational questions about education (e.g., What is the nature and purpose of education?) with a particular focus upon the role of public schools in a democratic society. We will read and watch texts drawn from philosophy, as well as from literature and history, as we consider the nature of teaching and learning at the classroom level and within the broader society. Issues addressed typically include: tensions between individual students' development and the needs of the broader society; the role of the educational system in a diverse and multicultural society; the nature and goals of classroom relationship (teacher/student and student/student); and approaches to educational reform. The required technology thread includes use of the computer software to create and edit documents, and use of course management software for access to electronic files and submission of assignments. There is no field component required for this course. Level: Open to any student; required of all Education Studies minors. Students interested in the secondary licensure program are encouraged to take EDU 201 in the sophomore year. Offered fall and spring semesters. Course is cross-listed in Philosophy and can be counted as a History/Philosophy/ Religion distribution credit.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

MAS-202 Multicultural Literatures

The richness of American culture is a result of the contributions made by individuals from a variety of groups, each expanding our definition of what it means to be American. In this course we will study the writing and cultures of a number of groups, among them Native American, Hispanic, Gay, African American, European American, and Asian American. We will try to hear individual voices through a variety of literary forms (including film), while exploring commonalities. This course is offered in the spring semester.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

MAS-210 Special Topics in Art History

The objective of this class is to develop the student's understanding of art history. Through the analysis of a particular theme or topic, students will gain a greater understanding of visual communication and its history. Since the content of this course varies from year to year, it may be repeated for credit upon the instructor's approval. Examples of course topics: Building for the Spirit; Religious Architecture from Antiquity to the Present; Women in Art; The Image of Man; Monumentality; Introduction to African Art; African American Art; The Art of the Ancient Americas; and Latin American Art.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

MAS-211 Peoples & Nations of Latin America

A survey of the history of Latin America from Pre-Columbian times through the Wars of Independence and the national period to the current day. This course will examine the various internal dynamics and external influences that have shaped the experiences of the countries of Latin America since independence. Emphasis on socioeconomic structures as the conditioning environment for political and cultural developments. A major focus will be historical analysis of scholarly monographs and primary source documents. This course is offered in the spring semester (when offered).
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

MAS-212 Instruments and Culture

An introduction to world-music instrumental cultures with an emphasis on organology. A wide selection of traditional instruments will provide a basis for the study of cultural, scientific, and artistic aspects of instrumental music. Specific cultures are illuminated by the examination of aesthetic principles valued by each tradition, the role of musical instruments in culture, the theory of each tradition, and the visual representation of the instrument as both a sound and an art object. The course culminates in a final project. For this project, students may choose to write a term paper, give a class paper presentation, perform on a traditional instrument, or design and build an instrument by constructing a replica of an existing instrument, modifying a traditional instrument, or creating a totally new musical instrument design. It is open to all students, is suitable for fulfilling distribution requirements, and is offered in the spring semester.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

MAS-213 Culture and Psychology

This course explores the ethnic and cultural sources of psychological diversity and unity through cross-cultural investigation. Topics include human development, perceptual & cognitive processes, intelligence, motives, beliefs & values, and gender relations.
Prerequisites: PSY-101
Credit: 1
Distribution: Behavioral Science

MAS-214 Global Pers. on Music Cultures&identity

This course is designed to develop awareness and analytical appreciation of global musical diversity found within a variety world cultures. It covers the origin of Ethnomusicology as a sub-discipline, the classification of instruments, the musical and contextual roles instruments play in various cultures, tonal systems in use, and polyphonic and polyrhythmic textures as commonly applied. Course objectives are met through analysis and discussion of texts, audio recordings, and ethnographic fieldwork videos. This course is offered in the fall semester of 2014-2015.
Prerequisites: MUS-102
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

MAS-217 Philosophy of Race

This course will examine the major personalities in African American political thought by locating them within America's complex and varied attitudes about race as a social, political, and economic signifier. The central questions that will drive the course are: How does race shape the political ideology of African Americans? To what extent does racial group identity shape an individual's political ideology? Will the end of racism produce new political thinking among African Americans? In short, this course is concerned with the interplay between group interest/ identity, personal biography, and individual interest in the various strains of African American political expression. While it is clear that African American political theory has never been singular - theories rather than theory - the position taken here is that it has been democratic in orientation. That is, African Americans of all political stripes (accommodationalist, integrationalist, and/or nationalist,) hold democracy as the best solution for solving America's race problem.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

MAS-221 American Dialects

An introduction to the study of dialects in America, with a particular focus on the diversity of American speech as reflected in its many cultural variations. Students will read about the varieties of American speech, study their historical, sociological, and linguistic background, and conduct original research in describing a cultural dialect. The course is offered in the second half, spring semester.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Language Studies

MAS-223 Topics in Ethics & Social Philosophy

Seminar discussion of a topic or area in ethical theory, applied ethics, or social and political philosophy.
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5-1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

MAS-230 The Multicultural Stage

This course will center on multicultural and intercultural theater and performance in the United States and around the world. The course will be divided into two sections: the first part of the course will focus on how theater has served as a way for marginalized racial and ethnic groups to express identity in America. We will look at plays written by African-American (Amiri Baraka's Dutchman, Suzan-Lori Parks' Venus), Latino/a (Nilo Cruz's Anna in the Tropics, John Leguizamo's Mambo Mouth), and Asian-American (David Henry Hwang's M. Butterfly, Julia Cho's BFE) playwrights. The second part of the course will offer an overview of the state of contemporary global performance. Ranging from Africa (Wole Soyinka's Death and the King's Horseman, Athol Fugard's Master Harold and the Boys), to Latin America (Griselda Gumbaro's Information for Foreigners, Ariel Dorfman's Death and the Maiden), to the Caribbean (Derek Walcott's Dream on Monkey Mountain, Maria Irene Fornes's The Conduct of Life), we will discuss how different cultures have performed gender, race, class, postcolonial and historically-marginalized perspectives. Throughout we will explore how theater exists as a vital and powerful tool for expressing the values, cultures, and perspectives of the diverse racial and ethnic groups in America and throughout the world. This course is suitable for freshmen and is offered in the spring semester of even-numbered years.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

MAS-241 America to 1877

An introduction to American history and to the departmental Core Goals in the process of historical investigation and understanding. Students will learn the basic facts and conceptual themes involved in Native Indian cultures, Puritanism, the American Revolution, the New Nation, expansionism, slavery, reform, Civil War, and Reconstruction. The course focuses on significant landmark political events, but also on the everyday experiences and social history of women, minorities, and other underrepresented groups. This course is offered in the fall semester.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

MAS-242 America Since 1877

The emphasis is upon some of the major issues in American politics and society since 1877: the growth of big business; changes in the lives of farmers, workers, and immigrants; the rise of the city; and reform movements among rural and urban labor and among minority groups. In addition to studying national history and the emergence of America as a world power, students will have an opportunity to investigate their own family histories. This course is offered in the spring semester.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

MAS-243 Topics in American History

Since the content of this course varies from semester to semester, it may be repeated for credit upon the instructor's approval.Refer to the Course Descriptions document on the Registrar's webpage for Topics and Descriptions of current offerings.
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5-1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

MAS-244 African American History

Emphasis on several crucial periods: slavery; Reconstruction and its aftermath; the civil rights and Black liberation movements of the 1960s; and contemporary African American culture. Relations between Blacks and Whites will be examined through the reading and discussion of classic African American texts by Douglass, Jacobs, Washington, DuBois, Wright, Angelou, Moody, Walker, Malcolm X, King, Baldwin, Gates, and others. This course is offered in some spring semesters.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

MAS-250 Topics in Latin Amer. History

Since the content of this course varies from semester to semester, it may be repeated for credit upon the instructor's approval.Refer to the Course Descriptions document on the Registrar's webpage for Topics and Descriptions of current offerings.
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5-1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

MAS-260 Topics in Asian History

Since the content of this course varies from semester to semester, it may be repeated for credit upon the instructor's approval.Refer to the Course Descriptions document on the Registrar's webpage for Topics and Descriptions of current offerings.
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5-1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

MAS-270 Topics in African History

Since the content of this course varies from semester to semester, it may be repeated for credit upon the instructor's approval.Refer to the Course Descriptions document on the Registrar's webpage for Topics and Descriptions of current offerings.
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5-1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

MAS-271 African History to 1885

Precolonial African history, focusing on the sociocultural, economic, and political realities of sub-Saharan societies between the Neolithic Period and the Partitioning of the Continent by European powers inaugurated in 1885. This course is offered in the fall semester (when offered).
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

MAS-272 African History From 1885

This course focuses on the sociocultural, economic, and political realities of sub-Saharan African peoples, in the precolonial (before 1885) era as well as colonial and postcolonial periods. A major focus will be historical analysis of scholarly monographs and primary source documents. The course serves both as a thematic survey of the region and preparation for further work in African Studies. This course is offered in the spring semester (when offered).
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

MAS-273 Topics in Theology

This is a discussion course on one or more figures, themes, or movements in Christian theology. Topics in recent years have included Augustine and Aquinas, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, and African Christianity.Refer to the Course Descriptions document on the Registrar's webpage for Topics and Descriptions of current offerings.
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5-1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

MAS-274 African American Political Theories

The course provides opportunities for specialized, innovative material focused on African American political theory for students at an intermediate level. Students interested in political theory topics beyond introductory level would benefit from this course the most. Since the content of this course varies from semester to semester, it may be repeated for credit upon the instructor's approval. Please check the course descriptions for a particular semester offering.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Behavioral Science

MAS-278 Spc Topics: Political in Science

Special Topics in Political Science.Refer to the Course Descriptions document on the Registrar's webpage for Topics and Descriptions of current offerings.
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5-1
Distribution: Behavioral Science

MAS-280 African American Religion

This is a discussion course on one or more figures, themes, or movements in American religion. Topics in recent years have included sects and cults in America, Puritanism, and African-American religious history.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

MAS-297 Anthropology of Religion

This is a discussion course examining the various ways anthropology describes and interprets religious phenomena. The course investigates anthropological theories of religion, and examines how they apply to specific religions in diverse contexts. Particular attention is paid to the social and symbolic functions of beliefs and rituals and to the religious importance of myths, symbols, and cosmology.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

MAS-300 Studies in Multicultural/National Lit

Toni Morrison and the African American Novel This course is about one thing, reading Toni Morrison's novels and her literary essays. In the process, we will explore the features of what Morrison calls the African American novel. We will also come to see and understand Morrison's mastery of craft and subject in the production of amazing stories that speak the "truth in timbre." The goals are to read, learn and grow in your understanding of the possibilities and limitations of rendering a people's lived experience in language. Jewish American Literature The contributions of Jewish American writers and filmmakers have been pervasive and significant. We will read selected fiction, poetry and plays, and see films that focus on the Jewish American experience. Authors and filmmakers may include Philip Roth, Bernard Malamud, Cynthia Ozick, David Mamet, Allen Ginsberg, and Woody Allen. African American Literature: Introduction This course explores various genres of African American Literature. Emphasis is placed on works that reflect the socio-historical development of African American life. Poetry, Slave narratives, autobiographies, novels, plays, musical lyrics, and spoken word form the subject of study in the course. Special attention is given to works of fiction that become motion pictures and the emerging area of audio books. The aim of the course is to provide students with a sense of the historical and contemporary developments within African American literature. Students are introduced to African American critical theory as well as African American history. Pen and Protest: Literature and Civil Rights This course takes a literary approach to the study of the civil rights movement. Students will examine the autobiographies, plays, novels, and other various artistic expressions of the mid-1950s through 1980. The aim of the course is to explore the use of literature and art as means of political, cultural, and religious expression. Students are introduced to critical theory as well as black studies.
Prerequisites: 1 Wabash English literature course.
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

MAS-301 Adv Topics: American History

This course provides opportunities for small group and independent work in intensive study of selected topics in American history. Since the content of this course varies from semester to semester, it may be repeated for credit upon the instructor's approval.Refer to the Course Descriptions document on the Registrar's webpage for Topics and Descriptions of current offerings.
Prerequisites: HIS-240,241,242,244 or 245
Credits: 0.5-1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

MAS-302 Intro to Literature

This first course in the study of literature examines the workings of literature: style, form, structure, genre, symbolism, allusion, and metaphor. It also includes an introduction to the lexicon of literary criticism and the principles of literary theory. Required for majors. This course is offered every semester.
Prerequisites: SPA-301
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

MAS-303 Studies in Historical Contexts

The Literature of the American 1920's "Here was a generation," wrote F. Scott Fitzgerald in the aftermath of the Great War, "grown up to find all Gods dead, all wars fought, all faiths in mankind shaken." This course examines the literature and culture of the 1920's in America and the American civilization that produced an extraordinary number of talented writers. We will focus upon major writers and significant texts of this decade-the Roaring Twenties, the jazz age, the great age of sport, the age of leisure, the plastic age. We will choose from among the best writers of the period. Writers may include Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Willa Cather, Sherwood Anderson, Sinclair Lewis, Eugene O'Neill, T.S. Eliot, John Dos Passos, Robert Frost, William Faulkner (and perhaps others of lesser renown). The Beat Writers The writers of the Beat Generation have a perennial appeal. Perhaps it is the Dionysian energy of their writing, perhaps the myths that arose around their self-destructive lives, but they have come to represent for us "the other side" of the Fifties. Since much of this course is focused on poetry, and Kerouac's novels may be considered extended prose poems, we will begin with some selections from Whitman's Song of Myself. We will also do some reading on the Fifties, and view The Beat Generation. Then we will turn to the early work of Ginsberg, especially his tremendous poem, "Howl." Next up is that late Ur-Text of the Beat Movement, Kerouac's novel, On the Road. We will focus on four poets of the San Francisco Renaissance, Michael McClure, Philip Lamantia, Gary Snyder, and Philip Whalen. Because Gary Snyder emerged as a major American poet, we will read one of his early books, Riprap, in its entirety and learn some principles of ecocriticism, then two later novels, Williams Burroughs' famous, infernal satire, Naked Lunch, and Kerouac's The Dharma Bums. We will conclude by reading the work of some less well-known Beats and fellow travelers, and the later work of Ginsberg and Snyder. Our focus will be the texts themselves and their relationship to American culture of the 1950s and after.
Prerequisites: 1 credit from ENG Wabash.
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

MAS-304 Diversity/Multicultural Educat

This course considers the curriculum and methods relevant to multicultural education and diversity (defined broadly to include developmental, motivational, gender, ethnic, cultural, and socioeconomic diversity) at the high school level. EDU 302a, offered for the first half of the semester for .5 credits, introduces students to the theory and practice that ground planning and instructional methods consistent with constructivism, including relevant learning theory and multicultural models for differentiating instruction to serve learners with exceptionalities including abilities/disabilities and language acquisition needs. EDU 302 b meets for the entire semester for 1 credit. After sharing instruction with EDU 302a for the first half of the semester, instruction during the second half of the semester is focused upon the application of the appropriate methods to lesson planning and classroom instruction. Required field experience for the 1 credit option (EDU 302b) consists of 25 hours; see details below. EDU 302a counts as .5 pedagogy credits for the minor in Education Studies, and is open to all students as an elective. EDU 302b for 1 credit is required for the Secondary Licensure Program. EDU 302b may be taken by Education Studies minors who are not pursuing licensure with the permission of the instructor. Field Component: Students in EDU 302b are placed in a content-specific high school classroom where they work collaboratively with a host teacher during the second half of the semester. (When possible, some field hours may be completed earlier in the semester.) EDU 302b students are expected to participate in regular (2-3 times per week) field visits to their host school and expected to increase the level of involvement in co-taught instructional activities each week. A minimum of five of the field experience hours should be spent in settings that incorporate Special Education and/or English Language Learning. The field component culminates in a two-week daily immersion experience in the high school classroom: students co-plan and co-teach lessons incorporating multiculturalism, culturally appropriate pedagogy and diversity.
Prerequisites: none
Credits: 0.5-1

MAS-311 Special Topics: Literature/Fine Arts

A variety of courses dealing with specific issues or sub-areas in the discipline are taught in a seminar setting.Refer to the Course Descriptions document on the Registrar's webpage for Topics and Descriptions of current offerings.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

MAS-312 Studies in Culture

Studies in Culture offers advanced study of Multicultural American culture. Topics may vary and include, but are not limited to: film, popular culture and arts, regional and ethnic identities, gender studies, politics, and religion. As they consider the connections among different disciplines and cultural contexts, students will develop the analytical tools and language specific to the interpretation of cultural moments and demonstrate those skills in interpretative essays and class discussion. May be retaken for credit if topic is different from previously taken course.
Prerequisites: 1 GROUP: FRE-301 OR SPA-301 AND 302 OR GER-301 AND 302
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

MAS-313 Studies in Hispanic Literature

Studies in Hispanic Literature offers advanced interdisciplinary study of Spanish and Latin American literary genres, periods, and authors. Topics may vary. Students read and analyze texts to better understand the dialog between literature and historical, political, and social realities, as well as the connections between Hispanic and other literary traditions. Students will develop the analytical tools and language specific to the interpretation of a particular genre and demonstrate those skills in interpretative essays and class discussion. May be retaken for credit if topic is different from previously taken course.
Prerequisites: SPA-301 and 302
Credit: 1
Distribution: Literature/Fine Arts

MAS-322 Research in Social Psychology

Students will cover a particular area of research in social psychology in more depth than is possible in a survey course. The topics covered will reflect contemporary issues in the field and may differ in different semesters. The course will cover primary research and theoretical works. A research proposal will be constructed, and students may carry out a research project in collaboration with the professor. This course is offered in the fall semester.
Prerequisites: PSY-202 and 222
Credit: 1
Distribution: Behavioral Science

MAS-325 Latin American Politics

An introduction to the politics of Latin America and the Caribbean Basin. Special attention will be given to political and economic development of the region, as well as to the unique role that the United States has played in this process. We will also examine the crucial impact that developments in this region have on domestic politics in the United States, especially with respect to such important issues as immigration and regional trade. PSC 325 may be offered in conjunction with courses in the Department of Modern Languages and cross-listed with studies of Hispanic language and culture. Students will be permitted to complete some class assignments in Spanish.
Prerequisites: Take PSC-121
Credit: 1
Distribution: Behavioral Science

MAS-350 Advanced Topics Latin America

This course provides opportunities for small group and independent work in intensive study of selected topics in Latin American history. Since the content of this course varies from semester to semester, it may be repeated for credit upon the instructor's approval.Refer to the Course Descriptions document on the Registrar's webpage for Topics and Descriptions of current offerings.
Prerequisites: Take 0.5 credits From History Dept
Credits: 0.5-1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

MAS-370 Adv Topics in African History

This course provides opportunities for small group and independent work in intensive study of selected topics in African history. Since the content of this course varies from semester to semester, it may be repeated for credit upon the instructor's approval.Refer to the Course Descriptions document on the Registrar's webpage for Topics and Descriptions of current offerings.
Prerequisites: Take 0.5 credits from History Dept
Credits: 0.5-1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

MAS-371 Special Topics in Education

This course is a seminar focused upon historical and/or philosophical topics in education. In general, historically-oriented and philosophically-oriented topics are taught in alternating years, and are cross-listed with the relevant department(s) as appropriate. The emphasis is upon shared exploration of the general background to the issue, accompanied by development of an independent research project connected to it. Because the content varies from year to year, this course may be repeated for credit with instructor permission. Level: Required for the Education Studies minor. Offered in the spring semester.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1

MAS-399 Proseminar: African Am Intel Thought

An advanced course in some selected philosophical topic.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1
Distribution: History/Philosophy/Religion

MAS-400 Senior Capstone

A full credit capstone course taken during the senior year. This may either be an independent study project under the direction of one of the faculty committee members or, if enough students are completing areas of concentration in a given year, an arranged class in which students will explore their minor topics comparatively as well as in greater depth.
Prerequisites: none
Credit: 1

The Multicultural American Studies minor is administered by the Multicultural Concerns Committee of the Wabash Faculty.